Advocates for veterans suspect that 10 to 20 percent of Iraq veterans have some form of traumatic brain injury. That means 150,000 to 300,000 veterans are living with this condition. The source of these disabling injuries among veterans often is traceable to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that service members encounter at war.

The full effects of a traumatic brain injury aren’t always known at the time of impact. Furthermore, there has not been an objective measure of the severity of such brain traumas. A federal agency is now addressing this problem.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has created a device called a blast gauge to be worn by soldiers. The tool measures the effects of an explosion. It also can provide critical warning signs in the event that a blast has caused severe brain trauma.

Warning Lights

The blast gauge, which is about the size of a thumb, has three colored lights and a dome of metal mesh to protect the microprocessor inside. It is designed to be strapped to body armor on the chest or shoulder or to the back of a helmet.

When a soldier is struck by an IED, the gauge immediately gathers information. One of the lights is activated depending on the severity of the explosion. When the soldier returns to the fire base or outpost, the gauge is inserted into a laptop through an USB cable. All of the available data are then translated into detailed waveforms that tell the soldier whether the blast was serious enough to cause concern about a possible TBI.

Even if a colored light indicates a mild blast, soldiers are encouraged to seek medical attention if they suspect a brain injury has occurred. The gauge contains essential information that can help doctors at field hospitals diagnose issues and perform triage.

Unfortunately, people who have brain trauma aren’t always able to give doctors the facts of what happened. So the gauge provides details that help medical caregivers choose an effective treatment without delay.

Simulation of Explosion

In addition to collecting information about blast waves, the gauge can reveal the terrain where the explosion took place and the presence of nearby walls or ditches, including their sizes. The gauge may even record whether vehicles were in the vicinity and whether their doors were open at the time of the event. Once the gauge is connected to a computer, this device offers a simulation of the actual explosion in full detail.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency continues to make improvements to the sensor. Scientists plan to give the gauge the capacity to protect soldiers from exceeding certain training and wartime blast standards. Military leaders can reassign soldiers to other positions if the safety threshold is reached. That would reduce exposure to blast dangers among those most at risk of injury.

About the Author

Since 1968, the South Carolina personal injury and workers’ compensation attorneys of Joye Law Firm have been committed to securing compensation for accident and injury victims. Our compassionate and dedicated lawyers have over 300 years of combined litigation experience, and many of them have been recognized as South Carolina Super Lawyers. For many years, our South Carolina personal injury law firm has been listed with an AV rating in the prestigious Martindale-Hubbell legal directory.

Recent Blog Post
What to do in South Carolina? Events for the week of June 11 - 17th in Charleston, Summerville, Columbia, Myrtle
What to Do in South Carolina: Joye Law Firm Staff Picks 6/11/24 – 6/17/24

    The Joye Law Firm team has curated an exciting lineup of events this week, perfect for the whole family to enjoy. From local markets to cultural celebrations, there’s something for everyone to experience. Enjoy these fantastic events and…

What to do in South Carolina? Events for the week of June 4 - 10th in Charleston, Summerville, Columbia, Myrtle
What to Do in South Carolina: Joye Law Firm Staff Picks 6/4/24 – 6/10/24

    The Joye Law Firm team has handpicked a selection of the most exciting activities, guaranteed to bring joy and entertainment to everyone. This week our team’s favorite summer events promise unforgettable experiences filled with fun, food, music, and…

Mark Joye sitting at his desk
Inside Super Lawyers: Recognizing Mark C. Joye

Joye Law Firm is pleased to announce that Mark C. Joye, the Head of our Litigation Department, has been selected for inclusion in South Carolina Super Lawyers for the 17th consecutive year. In addition to having been selected every year…

Avoid Truck Accidents by Avoiding Their Blind Spots

Americans love to drive SUVs and pickups because they are higher off the ground and provide a better view of the road. Because commercial trucks like 18-wheelers are even taller, you might think they’d have the best view of the…

Awards & Recognition
Media
ABC
NBC
Fox
CBS News
ESPN Radio logo