Every year, thousands of people die due to distracted driving accidents. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, distracted driving crashes killed 3,328 people in 2012. During April, National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, safety advocates have stepped up efforts to call attention to the extreme hazards of distracted driving.

Anything that removes your eyes, hands or mind from the task of driving is a diversion. Some common distractions include:

  • Texting
  • Using a cellphone
  • Eating or drinking
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player or MP3 player
  • Talking with passengers

In today’s digital age, texting and conversing on a cellphone top this list. Although it’s a fact that drivers who use hand-held devices are four times more likely than other drivers to be involved in a severe car accident, many people continue to keep their smartphones within reach behind the wheel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classify distractions into three types:

  • Visual – Removing your eyes from the road ahead.
  • Manual – Taking your hands off the wheel.
  • Cognitive – Letting your mind drift away from driving.

Texting is the riskiest distraction of all because it combines all three of these aspects.

You can help keep yourself and others on the road much safer. For example, the National Safety Council invites you to take the pledge to drive cell free. When you commit to this pledge, you’re doing your part to ensure that the act of driving gets the full attention it deserves.

South Carolina Legislation

South Carolina is one of a few states that do not have a law specifically addressing distracted driving. Some municipalities have passed their own laws, but they vary from place to place and may confuse drivers who travel throughout the state.

The South Carolina legislature currently is considering legislation aimed at distracted driving, including a proposal to bar all drivers from texting and another to prohibit novice drivers from using handheld devices.

Sources:

Recent Blog Post
What to Do if Someone is Tailgating You

Tailgating or following too closely behind another car is dangerous behavior, and often a form of road rage. It can easily lead to rear-end collisions and injury accidents. In South Carolina, 3,494 people were injured in 2019 by drivers following…

south carolina statute of limitations personal injury
What Is the Statute of Limitations for a Personal Injury Claim in South Carolina?

South Carolina law gives a person who has been injured by another party’s action or inaction three years in most situations to file a lawsuit seeking compensation for their injuries, financial losses, and pain and suffering. If the claim is…

How to Stay Out of Other Drivers’ Blind Spots on Your Motorcycle

Bikers need to be aware of all potential hazards on the road. That’s because the consequences of a minor collision on a motorcycle can be much more severe than in a car. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,…

Who is Liable for Boating Accidents in Bad Weather?

Boating is a popular recreational activity in South Carolina, with thousands of people taking to the state’s lakes, rivers and shores every year. However, weather conditions can often shift abruptly, and failing to stay informed and take the necessary precautions…

Awards & Recognition
Best Law Firm 2022
Million Dollar Advocates Forum
B Member
Martindale-Hubbell
Best Lawyers 2021 Small
BBB
ASJ Leaders Forum
National Trial Lawyers Top 100
Google Review
Avvo Rating
Media
CBS News
Fox
NBC
ABC